Upcoming Presentations

Funding Recovery: Exploring Higher Education Emergency Relief Funds at Community Colleges

March 7, 2:00–3:00 ET

The COVID-19 pandemic brought tremendous challenges to institutions of higher education across the country. Community colleges and their students, in particular, were negatively impacted. In this webinar, researchers from the Community College Research Center present findings from the Accelerating Recovery in Community Colleges (ARCC) Network's analysis of Higher Education Emergency Relief funds at U.S. community colleges. The webinar will include an overview of the amount of funds awarded to community colleges, insight into how much funding was spent, and a preview of an interactive dashboard for exploring pandemic relief funding.

Presenters

Hollie Daniels, Research Associate, CCRC

Tia Monahan, Senior Research Assistant and PEAR Fellow, CCRC

Megan Anderson, Project Assistant, CCRC

NASPA 2024 Annual Conference

March 9–13, 2024
Seattle, WA

DEEPening the Impact: Strategies for Broadening Access and Increasing Quality of Dual Enrollment Coursework

March 10, 10:10–11:00 AM PT

In this session, the Community College Research Center (CCRC) will review research on the potential of dual enrollment and present a research-based framework for reform called—‘dual enrollment equity pathways’ or DEEP—that addresses issues of access to dual enrollment for underserved students, offers strategies for college/K12 partnerships to address inequities in their programs, and outlines mindset shifts required to better support dual enrollment students. Our team will select and invite a community college leader to discuss how the DEEP framework can be implemented to transform from ‘programs of privilege’ and ‘random acts’ to more purposeful models. Our aim with the DEEP framework is to help community college leaders feel equipped to use the DEEP framework in broadening access and increasing quality in college coursework aligned to postsecondary degrees in fields of interest to students.

Presenters

Jessica Steiger, Senior Research Assistant and PEAR Fellow, CCRC

Aurely Garcia Tulloch, Research Assistant, CCRC

Dr. Christopher Conzen, Executive Director, Secaucus Center and Early College Programs, HCCC (Hudson County Community College)

Exploring First-Generation College Students’ Support Networks at Four California Public HSIs (Poster Session)

March 10, 11:10–11:40 AM PT
Regency Ballroom B1

Although much is known about the postsecondary outcomes of first-generation college students, far less is known about how first-generation college students build relationships and utilize support networks on- and off-campus. In partnership with two community colleges and two broad-access public universities in California, presenters will share findings and recommendations from a study that uses social network analysis methods to explore the types of relationships and supports that first-generation college students access, for what purposes, and with what results.

Presenters

Andrea Lopez Salazar, Research Associate, CCRC

Applying the Community College Research Center’s Research to Enhance Equitable Practices in Student Affairs (Poster Session)

March 11, 9:30–10:30 AM PT & March 12, 9:00–10:00 AM PT
Seattle Convention Center Summit Building

Community colleges play a crucial role in providing accessible and affordable higher education opportunities. Over the past 25 years, the Community College Research Center (CCRC)’s work has provided a foundation for innovations in higher education through applied research to inform policymakers and practitioners across the United States. This poster session will show how CCRC’s research can serve as a useful resource for enhancing equitable practices in student affairs.

Presenters

Aurely Garcia Tulloch, Research Assistant, CCRC

Shay Jenkins, Communications Assistant, CCRC

Exploring the Diversity of the First-Generation Student Identity in Order to Improve College Support Services

March 11, 3:50–4:40 PM PT
Summit 325

First-generation college students comprise more than one-third of undergraduates in the US but succeed at lower rates compared with their peers. Utilizing a mixed-methods design, we found that first-generation identity is not a monolith and that these students have a variety of relationships and knowledge that moderate their campus experience. The presenters will aim to provide insight into first-generation college student identities and suggest how colleges can improve supports for first-generation students and better direct limited resources.

Presenters

Andrea Lopez Salazar, Research Associate, CCRC

League for Innovation in the Community College Annual Conference

Facilitating Positive Student Help-Seeking Experiences in Online Courses

March 18, 11:30 AM–12:30 PM PT

In this session, participants will learn of the many struggles college students face when asking for help, particularly in courses for science, technology, education, and mathematics (STEM). Research has found that avoidance of help-seeking can result from experiences of discrimination and marginalization, but studies show college students who seek help have better outcomes and experiences (Fong et al., 2023). The Postsecondary Teaching with Technology Collaborative (The Collaborative) is a research and capacity-building center aiming to study and improve how faculty build students’ self-directed learning skills and increase success in online STEM courses. To understand how faculty can foster help-seeking, The Collaborative’s researchers interviewed 25 students from online STEM courses in 4 community colleges. Drawing from 11 participants, the Collaboratives data supports two main themes which demonstrate instructor accessibility and responsiveness facilitate help seeking and close faculty-student relationships enable a stronger sense of belonging for students in an online setting. Students also reported more comfort in seeking help when instructors demonstrated transparency. In this session, presenters will discuss these findings and gather participants’ views on the best ways to facilitate transparent communication and develop skills around compassionate interaction with marginalized students.

Presenters

Keena Walters, Research Associate, SRI Education

Jenivee Gastelum, Research Assistant, CCRC

Louise Yarnall, Senior Researcher, SRI Education

2024 AACC Annual Convention

April 5–9, 2024
Louisville, KY

Rethinking High School Dual Credit to Advance Student Success and Build Back College Enrollment

April 7, 10:00–10:45 AM ET

Enrollment of high school students taking community college dual credit courses has soared in recent years, even as the number of recent high school graduates matriculating at community colleges has declined. This session will feature a conversation with leaders of two colleges that have expanded enrollment by recent high school graduates by taking a more strategic approach to their dual credit offerings and students. Moderating the session will be a researcher from CCRC, which has recently published research on how colleges can rethink dual credit as a more effective and equitable onramp to community college degree programs for students after high school.

Presenters

Davis Jenkins, Senior Research Scholar, CCRC

Greg Hodges, President, Patrick & Henry Community College

Lynda Villanueva, President, Lee College

Tracking Transfer: Community College and Four-Year Institutional Effectiveness in Broadening Bachelor’s Degree Attainment

April 7, 3:30–4:15 PM ET

For the first time, national and state-level transfer outcomes are publicly available disaggregated by race, ethnicity, and income. Leaders from CCRC and Aspen will share the latest data from the National Student Clearinghouse. See how the nation and your state fare in serving transfer students, engage with interactive data dashboards, and learn more about possible strategies for improving transfer outcomes for all students.

Presenters

Davis Jenkins, Senior Research Scholar, CCRC

Josh Wyner, Vice President, Aspen Institute; Founder and Executive Director, College Excellence Program

The Role of Community Colleges in the Green Jobs Revolution

April 7, 3:30–4:15 PM ET

In light of an empowering new focus on how community colleges are experiencing and reacting to the pressures of climate change, join our session to hear from a panel of experts on sustainable workforce development in community colleges. Learn strategies for contributing to climate resilience and prepare your students & communities for the transition to the green economy.

Presenters

Maggie P. Fay, Senior Research Associate, CCRC

Panelists TBA, West Los Angeles College & Southwest Wisconsin Technical College

2024 AERA Annual Meeting

April 11–14, 2024
Philadelphia, PA

Pandemic Recovery Efforts in Practice: Community Colleges’ Use of Higher Education Emergency Relief Funds

Time TBA
Philadelphia Convention Center

This symposium session presents a comprehensive review of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on community colleges and their subsequent recovery efforts. Presenters will shed light on specific recovery efforts including the use of Higher Education Emergency Relief (HEER) Funds at community colleges, responses to sweeping declines in community college enrollment, and impacts on economic opportunities and transfer pathways that community college students rely on to more affordably obtain bachelor's degrees. Through an interactive panel discussion, participants will have the opportunity to engage in discussion about pandemic recovery efforts and needs, leaving with valuable insights into ways to address racial/ethnic disparities at community colleges and steps to guide policymakers and practitioners in crafting effective strategies for equitable student success.

Presenters

Tia Monahan, Senior Research Assistant and PEAR Fellow, CCRC

Hollie Daniels, Research Associate, CCRC

Understanding the Support Networks of First-Generation College Student

First-generation college students comprise more than one-third of undergraduates in the US but succeed at lower rates compared with their peers. Utilizing a mixed-methods approach, we found that the first-generation identity is not a monolith and that these students have a variety of relationships and knowledge that moderate their campus experience. The presenters will aim to provide insight into first-generation college student identities and suggest how colleges can improve supports for first-generation students and better direct limited resources.

Presenters

TBA

CSCC 2024 Conference

Access to Success: Insights and Strategies in Implementing Multiple Measures Assessment

Time TBA

CAPR, with support from Ascendium Education Group, are assisting colleges and states nationwide in the adoption and implementation of MMA practices that place more students, and allow more students to be successful, in college-level courses. This presentation summarizes insights derived from this work, focusing on the adoption of multiple measures assessment in open-access colleges in Arkansas and Texas. During the presentation, researchers will present cost analysis findings, explore supporting factors for implementation, and delve into specific strategies used by colleges to tackle common implementation challenges.

Presenters

Elizabeth Kopko, Senior Research Associate, CCRC

Dan Cullinan, Senior Associate, MDRC

Exploring Corequisite Implementation in the CUNY System

Time TBA

This presentation provides insights into the implementation of corequisite models in English and math courses across seven CUNY colleges, and discusses the challenges and opportunities faced by faculty, staff and administrators while scaling corequisite courses. Findings and implications about the variability in corequisite approaches and staff experiences are explored.

Presenters

Maggie P. Fay, Senior Research Associate, CCRC

Farzana Matin, Research Assistant, CCRC

Are We Ready for Transfers? Dismantling Barriers and Taking Collective Responsibility for Transfer Student Success

In this keynote address, John Fink synthesized CCRC's research on transfer.

Participants

Senior Research Associate and Program Lead
Community College Research Center