March 9–13, 2024
Seattle, WA

DEEPening the Impact: Strategies for Broadening Access and Increasing Quality of Dual Enrollment Coursework

March 10, 10:10–11:00 AM PT

In this session, the Community College Research Center (CCRC) will review research on the potential of dual enrollment and present a research-based framework for reform called—‘dual enrollment equity pathways’ or DEEP—that addresses issues of access to dual enrollment for underserved students, offers strategies for college/K12 partnerships to address inequities in their programs, and outlines mindset shifts required to better support dual enrollment students. Our team will select and invite a community college leader to discuss how the DEEP framework can be implemented to transform from ‘programs of privilege’ and ‘random acts’ to more purposeful models. Our aim with the DEEP framework is to help community college leaders feel equipped to use the DEEP framework in broadening access and increasing quality in college coursework aligned to postsecondary degrees in fields of interest to students.

Presenters

Jessica Steiger, Senior Research Assistant and PEAR Fellow, CCRC

Aurely Garcia Tulloch, Research Assistant, CCRC

Dr. Christopher Conzen, Executive Director, Secaucus Center and Early College Programs, HCCC (Hudson County Community College)

Exploring First-Generation College Students’ Support Networks at Four California Public HSIs (Poster Session)

March 10, 11:10–11:40 AM PT
Regency Ballroom B1

Although much is known about the postsecondary outcomes of first-generation college students, far less is known about how first-generation college students build relationships and utilize support networks on- and off-campus. In partnership with two community colleges and two broad-access public universities in California, presenters will share findings and recommendations from a study that uses social network analysis methods to explore the types of relationships and supports that first-generation college students access, for what purposes, and with what results.

Presenters

Andrea Lopez Salazar, Research Associate, CCRC

Applying the Community College Research Center’s Research to Enhance Equitable Practices in Student Affairs (Poster Session)

March 11, 9:30–10:30 AM PT & March 12, 9:00–10:00 AM PT
Seattle Convention Center Summit Building

Community colleges play a crucial role in providing accessible and affordable higher education opportunities. Over the past 25 years, the Community College Research Center (CCRC)’s work has provided a foundation for innovations in higher education through applied research to inform policymakers and practitioners across the United States. This poster session will show how CCRC’s research can serve as a useful resource for enhancing equitable practices in student affairs.

Presenters

Aurely Garcia Tulloch, Research Assistant, CCRC

Shay Jenkins, Communications Assistant, CCRC

Exploring the Diversity of the First-Generation Student Identity in Order to Improve College Support Services

March 11, 3:50–4:40 PM PT
Summit 325

First-generation college students comprise more than one-third of undergraduates in the US but succeed at lower rates compared with their peers. Utilizing a mixed-methods design, we found that first-generation identity is not a monolith and that these students have a variety of relationships and knowledge that moderate their campus experience. The presenters will aim to provide insight into first-generation college student identities and suggest how colleges can improve supports for first-generation students and better direct limited resources.

Presenters

Andrea Lopez Salazar, Research Associate, CCRC